FUSE Conference

Hello everyone,

I just returned from the FUSE Conference yesterday and decided that dedicating an entry to it would be a good way to start this blog. I attended the conference with a group of students and professors from Susquehanna University, with whom I hope that we can begin to have more events.

Myself and Morgan Blalock from Hollins University, we have tattoos of the same quote!

Myself and Morgan Blalock from Hollins University, we have tattoos of the same quote!

 

Again, I also extend my gratitude to everyone for welcoming me into their group with open arms, Jordan for organizing the FUSE conference in Davidson, Jenn for hosting me, and to Catherine Dent for extending the invitation for me to come along.

Coca Cola Robot in their Art Gallery

Coca Cola Robot in their Art Gallery

Throughout the conference I made a lot of new friends and learned so much about the different Lit Mags of the schools who attended. I’ve found that at writing conferences I become inspired by what other groups are doing and this sparks new ideas for The Reflector and SpawningPool.

Davidson Farm

Davidson Farm

This conference did the same. For those of you who haven’t previously attended any conferences, I strongly recommend it. They’re a treasure trove of ideas, information, and inspiration.

Myself and Emily Teitsworth from Susquehanna University

Myself and Emily Teitsworth from Susquehanna University

In this post, I’ll focus on ways that you can spread your work nationally. This is just a small portion of the Lit mags open to Undergraduate students nationally, but it’s a start. Others can be found on the FUSE site.

  1. The Susquehanna Review
    http://www.susquehannareview.com
    https://susquehannareview.submittable.com/submit
    Guidelines can be found on their submittable page.
  2. The Blue Route
    Guidelines can be found here.
    Submit work to: wutheblueroute@gmail.com
  3. Plain China
    You can not submit work to Plain China individually. It is an anthology and will only consider work previously published in a Literary Journal. For more information, see their website.
Chandelier in Phi Hall at Davidson

Chandelier in Phi Hall at Davidson

In Plain China’s panel at the FUSE Conference, they discussed the pros and cons of online Literary Journals. The internet has become a huge part of peoples’ lives now and the pressure to publish online is growing, both to widen your audience and save money (if you choose to publish only online).

Phi Hall at Davidson

Phi Hall at Davidson

Some of the positive aspects of publishing online are the connectivity involved. When you publish solely in print, you limit your audience to people in the nearby surrounding areas. When a publication is online it is open to the entire world to view it. Friends and relatives of those published, literary journal enthusiasts, and editors of other magazines all have access to your publication. Online publication also allows old issues of the magazine to be archived in a way that it is easily accessible.

Soda Shop in town

Soda Shop in town

A negative aspect is the ability to publish as much or as little content as you want. No longer is there a limit on number of pages that can fit in a certain binding. However, in cases where a publication rapidly grows, quality of the work being accepted may not be as good as it previously was.

Talking after the presentation at the Davidson Farm

Talking after the presentation at the Davidson Farm

In the category of neutral changes, online publication opens up the topic of opening submissions to students outside of your own university. Of course not all magazines allow this after publishing online, nor is it necessary to. But it’s interesting to see how increasing communication between schools and editors opens up these possibilities.

Lunch at the farm

Lunch at the farm

As a whole, the panel got me thinking about how much Literary Journals have changed just in the past few years. While I’m only a sophomore and my high school didn’t have a Literary Journal, I look forward to seeing how much Journals continue to transform over the next few years that I’m able to work with The Reflector and SpawningPool. Even within the time that I’ve been here I’ve seen so many changes. This blog is a step in a new direction, opening up these opportunities to publish our magazine here and archive old copies of The Reflector.

Flies control the direction of a robotic exhibit at the Art Gallery

Flies control the direction of a robotic exhibit at the Art Gallery

I hope that you’ve enjoyed reading this and that my understanding of blogging improves as I go on. Please join me on this journey, but I call being Bilbo Baggins.

Another exhibit at the Art Gallery

Another exhibit at the Art Gallery

Maddie Moyer-Keehn, PR Chair of The Reflector

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